Screen Melt — Part 2

We lost power due to an ice storm during the early morning hours of the second firing on Friday. Fortunately the kiln had already gone through its anneal stage and was cooling to room temperature! I let the kiln sit until we got our power back on Sunday. No worries about shocking the glass after 2 days in a cold kiln.

The top of the screen melt did exactly what I wanted it to do, which was smooth out. No spikes left and a nice smooth surface with no devit.

After the second firing, note the nice smooth finish and no spikes.

After the second firing, note the nice smooth finish and no spikes.

The bottom, as expected, had kiln wash stuck to it. Sorry I didn't get a picture of the bottom of the glass before I cleaned it up. I did get a picture of the kiln shelf tough.

Where you see pink kiln shelf is where the kiln wash stuck to the glass.

Where you see pink kiln shelf is where the kiln wash stuck to the glass.

I like to give the edges a quick grind on the Wizard grinder to knock off any sharp spots and reduce the risk of getting cut when I'm handling the screen melt.

To remove the kiln wash from the bottom of the screen melt I used wet/dry sand paper, a water bucket to work in, and a little elbow grease. It took less than 10 minutes to clean it up. When I get ready to use the screen melt I'll probably hit the bottom with some silicone carbide and some wet/dry sand paper, just to be sure there is no kiln wash left. 

The bottom of the screen melt after using just wet/dry sand paper.

The bottom of the screen melt after using just wet/dry sand paper.



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